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Archive for the ‘film’ Category

London UFO–is it real?

A new viral video making the rounds on the Internet purports to show what’s been dubbed a “mothership” and at least three separate smaller alien spacecraft filmed in the skies over London.

The most famous video (which was taken anonymously and is one of two or three versions in circulation) shows a large glowing white oval moving in and out from behind clouds over the course of about 20 seconds, and then zooming off, with three white dots also making an appearance. — Space.com

 

see also:   Is the UFO  Mothership Over London Video Real?

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…as though Ed Wood Jr. had attempted to film a script by Thomas Pynchon about a script Pynchon secretly wrote to be adapted by Wood. — J. Hoberman Village Voice

Unrelentingly lurid and equally hilarious, Tribulation 99: Alien Anomalies Under America might be an X-ray of a rabid slacker’s seething brain… 48-minute[s]… of underground agitprop.

This nutty little item suggests that conspiracy thinking is a Frankenstein monster which inevitably destroys its creator (First you have the conspiracy theory, and then the conspiracy theory has you).

see also:  MOCK UP ON MUTribulation 99:  Alien Anomalies Under America, Appropriation & Culture Jamming, JFK – Craig Baldwin, Spectres of the Spectrum

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Gidget, late 1990’s spokesdog for the Taco Bell restaurants, has gone to her reward.

Born, Montemorelos Nuevo Leon Constanza Jaunita Jesus de Gedgitita, her acting teacher Marco Perella, suggested the name “Gidget,” over margarita’s at their Georgetown home. The name stuck –and the rest was history.

Her early years were spent chasing ‘ardillas‘ (spanish for squirrels) and gnawing on the pecans that fell to the ground under a giant tree in the back yard.

An observable talent for drama, Gidget developed her acting muscles under the teaching duo of Marco and Diane Perella, the famed comedy team responsible for The Melancholy Ramblers.

Turned down for the role of Underdog, ostensibly because her ears were too big.

bigger-box

Gidget: December 25, 1994 -- July 21, 2009

The chihuahua came to fame, after the phrase, “¡Yo quiero Taco Bell!” smashed into the public consciousness. Later, the fearless pooch’s utterance; “Here lizard, lizard, lizard,” went viral during the promotion of the 1998 remake of “Godzilla.” The film stared Matthew Broderick as Dr. Niko Tatopoulos. The actor could not be reached for comment but a spokesperson for Mr. Borderick said he was “grief stricken” at the news.

During the summer of 1998, several commercials pairing Godzilla with the Taco Bell mascot were produced and aired, including several with the chihuahua trying to catch Godzilla in a tiny box, whistling and calling, “Here, lizard, lizard, lizard.” When Godzilla appears, the chihuahua says, “Uh-oh. I think I need a bigger box.”

Some…accused the dog of being a thinly veiled cultural stereotype. The company stopped showing the dog in advertisements in 2000. It was incorrectly rumored that Taco Bell ended the commercials because the dog died.

Legal troubles

Dogged by claims of racial and cultural insensitivity, She pressed on — through the last decade of her life Gidget, managed to regain some of the credibility lost her after a spate of legal battles with her corporate masters. In the Surpreme Court ruling: Gidget vs Taco Bell, justices ruled 8 to 1 in her favor, citing Stare decisis et non quieta movere. Justice Thomas, being the lone dissenter.

Drug and alcohol abuse

Depressed by the stink left in the wake of her all too short film career, penny-less unemployable, Gidget sought solace in the bottle. Friends were horrified when they discovered she had chewed her tail ragged. Only after months of detox and obediance training, was she able to reinvent her life.

Retiring years

Her retiring years were not totally spent in ruminating over what might have been. There were times of relaxation –sitting in her chair in front of the air conditioner she dreamed of the glory days to come, forgetting her past stardom.  Even so, the stress of legal wrangling took it’s toll. In 2004, Gidget was found wandering her neighborhood, dazed and confused. It was later reveled in her memoirs, she had “O. D.” on food scraps and chicken bones left in the kitchen trash can.

Political activism

Again, on the road to recovery, an awakening sense of political activism pushed Gidget into the limelight once more. Thrilled by the nomination of Sotomayor…urged her fellow pooches to stop making Supreme Court nominations like Sonia Sotomayor’s a “battle over our culture.”

…called Sotomayor’s hard-knocks life “a helluva story,” though she disagreed with some of her views.

At the time of her passing Gidget was developing a screenplay,  based on the book “A Dog’s Life, The Autobiography of a Stray” by Ann M. Martin.

Gidget died of a stroke on Tuesday, July 21, 2009. She was 15.

see also:  The Taco Bell dog has Died, For Whom The Taco Bell TollsTaco Bell ChihuahuaGodzilla (1998 film)

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Longshanks is dead! Long live the king.

Patrick McGoohan as Longshanks King Edward I in the blockbuster Braveheart

Patrick McGoohan as Longshanks King Edward I in the blockbuster Braveheart

The actor who once turned down the rolls of James Bond and the Saint but later went on to become one of the UK’s highest paid stars, has died at the age of 80.

Everett Collection/Rex Features

McGoohan made his name with Danger Man, a TV spy drama that was first broadcast in the UK from 1960 to 1968. He played secret agent John Drake, who worked mainly for NATO but often questioned the ethics of his missions. Photograph: Everett Collection/Rex Features

British actor /director /writer Patrick McGoohan, who oddly enough, was born in the US, raised in Ireland and played Number Six in the cult TV series “The Prisoner,” died Tuesday January 13 2009, in Los Angeles after a short illness according to his son-in-law, film producer Cleve Landsberg.

Who is Number One? You are Number Six. I am not a number!

Famous for his portrayal of the unnamed secret agent known only as Number Six, a character that would ultimately imprison McGoohan, due to type casting, is about a secret agent who resigns his commission suddenly and wakes up to find himself in a prison disguised as a holiday resort known euphemistically as The Village.

Portmeirion is a village in Wales, built by architect Clough Williams-Ellis. He wanted to build a place designed in harmony with the surrounding landscape. Built in 2 phases, with a delay caused by the WWII. Now a private resort open to visitors. Location of the British TV series "The Prisioner," filmed there in the 60's.

Portmeirion is a village in Wales, built by architect Clough Williams-Ellis. He wanted to build a place designed in harmony with the surrounding landscape. Built in 2 phases, with a delay caused by the WWII. Now a private resort open to visitors. Location of the British TV series "The Prisioner," filmed there in the 60's.

ITV/Rex Features

Following the success of Danger Man, McGoohan and George Markstein created The Prisoner, an innovative, surreal series blending elements of spy novels, sci-fi and psychological thrillers. Originally screened in 1967-68, the show did not attract big ratings but has influenced TV directors and film-makers. Photograph: ITV/Rex Features

Raised to Cult status.

The cult of The Prisioner spawned many books, college courses, a quarterly magazine and documentaries.

60's cult tv series "The Prisoner"

60's cult tv series "The Prisoner"

McGoohan at his LA home last year

McGoohan at his LA home last year

A partial filmography includes: Ice Station Zebra, Scanners, Silverstreak, The Phantom, Braveheart.


see also:  Patrick_McGoohan, Patrick McGoohan in pictures: The Prisoner, Danger Man and more, Why ‘The Prisoner’ Endures

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